Thursday, November 8, 2007

Four color decks

Does anyone else use them? For those of you not familiar, many if not all online sites allow you to have the cards represented by the normal Black Spades and Red Hearts but swap in Green Clovers and Blue Diamonds. I find this "Lucky Charms" mode to be INCREDIBLY useful especially because am playing Stud on four or five tables squished down on my laptop screen so the pips are only a few pixels wide. Being in four color mode makes it soooo much easier to process flushes and in particular when I am playing Stud where I want to see how many of my flush outs are dead. If you haven't tried it yet, I recommend it.

P.S. I also noticed that in the Cake Hand History pages, there is even a checkbox to view the hand in four color.

P.P.S. There are also physical four color cards for playing live games. Can't really warm up to that idea though.

P.P.P.S. I am glad they chose the colors that they did for the 3rd and 4th suits. I think that those were the most appropriate color choices that they could have come up with. Red Hearts is a natural choice. Green Clovers totally makes sense. Black Spades also a no brainer. And that leave Diamonds which generally have no distinct hue to pick up the only reasonable fourth color remaining, Blue.

7 comments:

Ryan said...

Yeah, I have four-color on. It's particularly helpful for multitabling, and for Omaha. Live-game four color does feel a bit sacreligious, but I'm not sure why it feels OK online but not live...

Marshall said...

I use it 100% of the time. You get used to it and turning it off becomes quite alarming.

Sushi Cowboy said...

Four color decks: TNP Approved!

Austin said...

I love it. Have it on constantly. On small screens it's very easy for me to mix up two of the same colors, so this helps out tremendously.

Bob Loblaw said...

Can't see how it would help a live game, but it sure sounds like a good idea online.

Concerning the "rightness" of green clovers and blue diamonds, I'd like to know which came first: 4-color decks or Lucky Charms cereal. And I bet it's Lucky Charms. So, with that, there was NO other choice than blue diamonds and green clovers, regardless of what looks right in nature. It's only what sounds right in the context of stale, colorful little marshmallows that really counts.

I’d like to propose we swap out black spades for purple horseshoes.

Marshall said...

LOL@ purple horseshoe poker suits. That would be so sick.

Sushi Cowboy said...

I knew they had been monkeying with the charms over the years. I recall feeling like they bastardized the "original" mix of charms from when I was a kid but they actually have ALWAYS messed with the mixture. Brief history of the cereal below...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucky_Charms

Originally Lucky Charms consisted of 1 type of marbit and that was a multicolored rainbow. Subsequently, the General Mills marketing department found that sales performed dramatically better if the composition of the marbits changed periodically.[1] Various other features of the marbits were also modified to maximize their appeal to the cereal's target young consumers. In focus groups and market research, more brightly colored charms resulted in better sales than dull or pastel colors.[1] Holahan called Lucky Charms a "lesson in creative marketing."[4] Currently, General Mills conducts frequent "concept-ideation" studies on Lucky Charms.[1]

For a brief period of time in 1975, Lucky the Leprechaun was replaced as the cereal's mascot by Waldo the Wizard, who performed better in focus groups and initial market tests than Lucky. Waldo was quickly retired, and Lucky once again reinstated a year later.[5]

...

The main selling point for Lucky Charms has always been the marshmallows (or "marbits" as General Mills calls them). The first boxes of Lucky Charms cereal contained marshmallows in the shapes of pink hearts, yellow moons, orange stars, and green clovers. The lineup has changed occasionally over the years, beginning with the introduction of blue diamonds in 1975. Purple horseshoes joined the roster in 1984, followed by red balloons in 1989, rainbows in 1992, pots of gold in 1994, leprechaun hats in 1996, and shooting stars in 1998.[1]